Talking Point (aka Shameless Plug)

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As anyone who knows me well will testify, I’m not great at blowing my own horn (unless I happen to be in the car and some ‘white-van man’ cuts me up in a wreckless and dangerous fashion). So today I am about to change all that (for today, at least).

One of the best things about my working life is receiving feedback from my clients. (And the lovelier it is, then all the better!)

Knowing that my clients are satisfied with the work I produce makes me happy, too. And, let’s face it, when you are working ‘home alone’ on your own, it can be wonderfully motivating to get a nice pat on the back every now and then.

So here’s a rather nice extract from an email I received today from one of my favourite clients in response to the very first draft of the copy I submitted:

 “You are one truly talented writer…

“You’ve managed to capture the essence of our business
and the copy is quite simply stunning.
When can we book you again?”

Awww, that’s nice.

Expect to see further shameless plugs from time to time at a blog near you…

(And if you happen to have anything nice to say, please don’t hold back!)

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Let the Writer Beware

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Picture by ‘elginwx’ via Flickr

I caught Channel 5’s The Wright Stuff earlier on today — not literally, but while I was eating a late breakfast with the TV on. Doh!

The presenter Matthew Wright was asking for views on the coalition’s plans to mark down pupils for poor grammar and spelling, as part of the education reform proposals. As a practising wordsmith who verges on the anal side of being pedantic, my ‘editor-antennae’ had no choice but to automatically switch themselves on.

For once, I wholeheartedly agree with the coalition.  Pupils should get a rap for not being ‘bovard’ to use correct spelling, punctuation and grammar. But surely the teachers, past governments and the current ‘mamby-pamby’ teaching system should share some responsibility. Let’s face it, the dismal standard of teaching in our schools during the last few decades has a lot to answer for.

Case in point: it has been reported that most employers are increasingly concerned about the poor standard of literacy among job applicants, the majority of whom don’t seem to be able to correctly construct a simple sentence, let alone consider the implications of a misplaced apostrophe.

Cor blimee, wots the world cum in 2?  😉

The point is, if your copy is going out into the public realm and is to represent either yourself or an organisation, it really shouldn’t be riddled with errors. While the occasional typo needn’t be the end of the earth, inattention to detail and sloppy copy will serve to confuse readers (and annoy them, even).

As one reader referred to as ‘Jaded’ perfectly sums up (in response to an online forum debate regarding the same): “Poor grammar and spelling, whether intentional or not, are like CAPITAL LETTERS. They slow down comprehension. ”

The English language is wonderfully rich and is meant to evolve, but it doesn’t mean that it should be abused as a result of simple ignorance (or even pure disdain). Attention to detail always counts.

“But, really, who cares if people are able to get the general meaning across?” you might argue.

Then caveat scriptor, say I . . . Let the writer beware.

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Want to use this in your ezine, blog or website? No problem! Just let me know. I’ll send you a short resource box/bio to include.